Economy

Income of Commoner: 5 GP a week (Take 10, no modifier, divided by 2 is 5, so 5 GP a week). Lives an Average lifestyle (10 GP). Has 15 GP disposable income at end of month.

Income of Expert: 8 GP, 5 SP a week (Take 10, 1 rank, 3 skill training, 3 skill focus, 1 ability score bonus, divided by 2 is 9, so 9 GP) Lives an Average lifestyle (10 GP). Has 35 GP disposable income at end of month.

Income of Aristocrat that is collecting taxes is equal to half of living cost of those whom they are extracting living costs from. Remember, living cost is only once a month.

Cost of living:

An adventurer’s primary source of income is treasure, and his primary purchases are tools and items he needs to continue adventuring—spell components, weapons, magic items, potions, and the like. Yet what about things like food? Rent? Taxes? Bribes? Idle purchases?

Sure, the adventurer can pay these as he goes. But the cost of living in an inn, and eating out every night, can get expensive. Fast. It is far easier for an adventurer to have a permanent residence and purchase his resources at the market.

To put the value of currency in perspective, the costs listed below, shows how far a gold piece will go towards cost of living at different standards of comfort. A single gold piece is enough for a peasant to subsist at a wretched quality of life.

Destitute (0 gp/month): The PC is homeless and lives in the wilderness or on the streets. A destitute character must track every purchase, and may need to resort to Survival checks or theft to feed himself.

Poor (3 gp/month): The PC lives with his parents, or in some other communal situation—this is the lifestyle of most untrained laborers and commoners. He need not track purchases of meals or taxes that cost 1 sp or less.

Average (10 gp/month): The PC lives in his own apartment, small house, or similar location—this is the lifestyle of most trained or skilled experts or warriors. He can secure any nonmagical item worth 1 gp or less from his home in 1d10 minutes, and need not track purchases of common meals or taxes that cost 1 gp or less.

Wealthy (100 gp/month): The PC has a sizable home. He can secure any nonmagical item worth 5 gp or less from his belongings in his home in 1d10 minutes, and need only track purchases of meals or taxes in excess of 10 gp.

Extravagant (1,000 gp/month): The PC lives in a mansion, castle, or other extravagant home—he might even own the building in question. This is the lifestyle of most aristocrats. He can secure any nonmagical item worth 25 gp or less from his belongings in his home in 1d10 minutes. He need only track purchases of meals or taxes in excess of 100 gp.

??? Higher?

EQUIPMENT AVAILABILITY

Adventurers may sometimes wish to purchase equipment in greater volume than the town they are in can handle. This is not normally a concern when characters are just beginning their career. But if experienced adventurers decide they want to use a dragon’s hoard to equip all their followers with fur cloaks and purchase a dozen heavy warhorses with plate barding, they may find such goods are simply unavailable in the quantities they desire! The amount of equipment available for purchase is determined by the price of the equipment relative to the size of the market
the adventurers are in. A market can be anything from a village’s humble fair to a city-state’s outdoor bazaar to the ports of a major metropolis. Markets are rated by market classfrom I to VI, which rate their size and importance.

The vast mercantile hubs of empires, with urban populations of 100,000 or more, constitute Class I. Major ports, national capitals, and other large cities of 25,000 or more inhabitants constitute Class II. Provincial capitals and medium-sized cities of 8,750 to 25,000 inhabitants make up Class III. Small cities and large towns of 3,000 to 8,750 inhabitants make up Class IV. Small towns and large villages of 1,250 to 3,000 inhabitants are Class V. Any village of 1,250 inhabitants or less is Class VI. Market classes are also important for hiring henchmen, as discussed in the Hirelings, Henchmen, Mercenaries, and Specialists section below, and for trade and commerce, as discussed in the Mercantile Ventures section. The Equipment Availability by Market Class table shows how many units of any piece of equipment are available in each type of market each month. Some values will indicate a percentage chance; this is chance of one unit being present at all in any given month. Note that the values given are the number of each specific item, not the total number of items at that price level. For instance, a Class IV market will have 5 swords, 5 battle axes, and 5 of each other item priced at 2-10gp. Multiple small items sold as a bundle (such as 12 spikes, 6 torches, 20 arrows, etc) count as one item for purposes of the Equipment Availability by Market Class table.

Equipment Availability by Market Class

Price Class I Class II Class III Class IV Class V Class VI
1gp or less 1,700 585 260 65 30 10
2gp–10gp 100 30 15 5 1 1
11–100gp 15 5 2 1 25% 10%
101–1,000gp 7 2 1 25% 10% 5%
1,001–10,000gp 2 1 25% 10% 5% 1%
10,001gp or more 10% 5% 2% NA NA NA

Economy

The Crawl EugeneGM